Testicular replacement

Losing one or both testicles can have a huge impact on self-esteem, relationships and even lifestyle, but there are solutions. Read more about the function of the testicles

Reference

(1). The Management of Peyronie’s Disease: Evidence-based 2010 Guidelines.

Ralph, D., Gonzalez-Cadavid, N., et al. J. Sex Med 2010; vol. 7

(2). It’s a Guy Thing. Levin, L. Med Update 2007

Testicles, or testes are part of the male reproductive system. They are two oval organs located inside the scrotum, the loose sack of skin that hangs behind the penis. The testicles make the male hormones, including testosterone, and produce sperm, the male reproductive cells.

Disorders of the testes or trauma to the testes can lead to serious complications, including hormonal imbalances, sexual dysfunction and infertility. Loss of the testes can have a negative psychological effect and may impact your self esteem and/or self confidence (1).

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Signs and causes

Functioning of the testicles Functioning of the testicles Read more

Reference

1. Testicular prostheses: body image and sexual functioning, BJU International (1999), 84, p1043-1045.

Testicles, or testes are part of the male reproductive system. They are two oval organs located inside the scrotum, the loose sack of skin that hangs behind the penis.

The testicles make the male hormones, including testosterone, and produce sperm, the male reproductive cells. Disorders of the testes or trauma to the testes can lead to serious complications, including hormonal imbalances, sexual dysfunction and infertility. Loss of the testes can have a negative psychological effect and may impact your self esteem and/or self confidence (1).

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Disorders that affect the testicle Disorders that affect the testicle Learn more about common issues that affect the testes

References

Reference:

1. Testicular Cancer: Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Topics, www.cancer.org.

2. The Fact on Undescended Testicles, KidsHealth from Nemours, www.kidshealth.org.

Some of the more common disorders that affect the testes include the following:

 

Testicular trauma or physical injury

 Unlike other body organs, testicles are not protected by muscle or bone and are therefore vulnerable to impact and injury.

 

Testicular torsion

The spermatic cord, which secures the testicles at either end, gets twisted around a testicle, cutting off the testicle's blood supply. Symptoms of testicular torsion include sudden and severe pain, enlargement of the affected testicle, tenderness, and swelling.

This is a medical emergency, and if the blood supply to the testicles is cut off for an extended  period of time, the testicle can become permanently damaged and correction of the problem may be through surgical removal of the testicle.

 

Testicular rupture

A rare type of testicular trauma, called testicular rupture, occurs when the testicle receives a direct impact or is squeezed against the hard surface of the pelvis. This injury can cause blood to leak into the scrotum. In severe cases, surgery to repair the rupture and save the testicle may be necessary.

 

Cancer

 Testicular cancer can develop in one or both testicles in men or young boys. Symptoms of testicular cancer may include a lump, irregularity or enlargement in either testicle; a pulling sensation or feeling of unusual heaviness in the scrotum; a dull ache in the groin or lower abdomen; and pain or discomfort (which may come and go) in a testicle or the scrotum.(1)

Surgery is the most common treatment for testicular cancer and involves removing one or both testicles.

 

Undescended testicle (cryptorchidism)

 This is a condition in which the testicles do not descend from the abdomen, where they are located during development before birth, to the scrotum. This condition is a major risk factor for testicular cancer. (2)

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Treatment options

If you have had or are about to have one or both testicles removed, read more about what your choices are. Read more

There are options for you to consider if you have had or are about to have one or both testicles removed during surgery.

Before making any decision, you should talk to your doctor about your long-term expectations, your concerns, and the potential risks or complications posed by each available option. Here’s an overview:

 

Non-surgical

No treatment: Leaves a partially empty or completely empty scrotum.

 

Surgical

Subcapsular orchiectomy: Removes much of the tissue from the testicular capsule, leaving a smaller scrotal structure.
A testicular prostheses such as the Coloplast KiWee is then placed into the scrotum. 

Made of a thin and soft silicone elastomer envelope filled in with a high performance, transparent, highly resilient silicone gel. The shape, density and consistency are close to human tissue for patient satisfaction.

Find out more about Coloplast KiWee

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What to expect?

KiWee Testicular Prosthesis Read more
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What to expect before surgery?

The KiWee testicular prostheses are made of a a thin and soft silicone elastomer envelope filled in with a high performance, transparent, highly resilient silicone gel. The shape, density and consistency are close to human tissue for patient satisfaction.

 

Read more about KiWee

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