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What is a stoma?

A stoma is the result of an operation that is meant to remove disease and relieve symptoms. It is an artificial opening that allows faeces or urine either from the intestine or from the urinary tract to pass.The stoma is created of an end of the intestine, which is brought to the surface of your abdomen to form the stoma (opening).

What is a colostomy? What is a colostomy? A colostomy, the most common type of stoma, is formed and positioned in the large bowel. Output from a colostomy will differ depending on where in the large bowel the stoma is positioned. What you need to know about a colostomy?
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What is a colostomy?

A colostomy is the most common type of stoma formed and is positioned in the large bowel. Output from a colostomy will differ depending on where in the large bowel the stoma is positioned. It may be formed, similar to a normal stool, or slightly looser.

 

How is a colostomy made?

During colostomy surgery, the end or a portion of the colon is brought through an opening on the surface of the abdomen (belly). The part of the bowel you see on your abdomen is called the stoma. The stoma may be located on the right side (ascending colostomy), center (transverse colostomy), or left side (descending or sigmoid colostomy) of your abdomen. The location will depend on the reason for your colostomy. The stoma is where the stool will now pass from your body. The stoma may or may not stick out from your abdomen.


How does a colostomy look?

A healthy stoma is moist and red or pink in color. It is usually round or oval in shape and should protrude approximately 0.5–1.0 cm. There are no nerve endings in the stoma, so it will not hurt when touched. It is normal for the stoma to be large and swollen after surgery, however it will shrink to a smaller size within five to six weeks.

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What is an ileostomy? What is an ileostomy? An ileostomy, is the second most common type of stoma, is formed and is positioned in the small bowel. Output from an ileostomy is usually loose watery stools. What you need to know about an ileostomy
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What is an ileostomy?

An ileostomy, is the second most common type of stoma, is formed and is positioned in the small bowel. Output from an ileostomy is usually loose watery stools.

 

How is a ileostomy made?

In an ileostomy operation, a part of your small intestine called the ileum is brought to the surface of your abdomen to form the stoma. An ileostomy is typically created in cases where the end part of the small intestine is diseased, and is usually made on the right-hand side of your abdomen.Stools in this part of the intestine are generally fluid and, because a stoma has no muscle to control defecation, will need to be collected in a pouch.


Is an ileostomy permanent?

Ileostomy surgery is typically performed to cure or alleviate symptoms of a disease. The ileostomy may be permanent or temporary, depending on your disease process.

  • Temporary ileostomy – the doctor can reconnect the small intestine and close the stoma.
  • Permanent ileostomy – the small intestines cannot be reconnected and closed.

Some permanent ostomy surgeries include the removal of the colon and rectum, yet there may still be a feeling of the need to have a bowel movement. This is normal and should ease with time. If you still have your rectum, mucus may build up and pass from the rectum the same way as a bowel movement. Mucus is produced to help the stool pass through (even if no stool is being passed).

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What is a urostomy? What is a urostomy? If your bladder or urinary system is damaged or diseased and you are unable to pass urine normally, you will need a urinary diversion. This is called a urostomy, an ileal conduit or a Bricker bladder. What you need to know about a urostomy?
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What is a urostomy?

If your bladder or urinary system is damaged or diseased and you are unable to pass urine normally, you will need a urinary diversion. This is called a urostomy, an ileal conduit or a Bricker bladder.

 

How is a urostomy made?

During the most commonly performed urostomy surgery, called an ileal conduit, the surgeon takes a six to eight inch piece of the small bowel (the ileum) and makes it into a conduit (or pipeline) for urine. The remainder of the small bowel is reconnected so your bowel will function as it did before surgery. This process is similar to splicing a hose. The ureters (tubes that carry urine from each kidney to the bladder) are removed from the bladder and joined to the piece of ileum (small bowel). One end of the piece of ileum that was removed is sewn closed and the other end is brought through an opening on the abdomen (belly). The part of the ileum you see on your abdomen is called the stoma. The stoma will probably stick out from the abdomen about 1 inch. This is where urine will now drain from your body. 

How does a urostomy look?

A healthy stoma is moist and red or pink in color. The stoma has no nerve endings, so it will not hurt when touched. It is normal for the stoma to be large and swollen after surgery, however, it will shrink to a smaller size within a few weeks. You may see your stoma move slightly. This is a normal process that had helped push stool through your bowel and now helps drain urine outward and into the pouch on your abdomen. Just like your gums bleed when brushing your teeth, your stoma may also bleed slightly. However, if your urine is cloudy, foul smelling, bloody, or you experience constant bleeding, contact your doctor immediately. 

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World Ostomy Day 2015 is organized by The International Ostomy Association, IOA

#MyOstomyStory is initiated by Coloplast A/S, UncoverOstomy, IOA and partners.

By submitting your story via #MyOstomyStory, you allow Coloplast A/S and partners to display it via own websites

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